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LePage Signs Bill Allowing Bald Mountain Mining

AUGUSTA, Maine — Gov. Paul LePage has signed a bill to revise Maine’s mining regulations. Environmentalists expressed reservations with the law, saying it weakens groundwater standards for mining operations and cleanup requirements for mining operations.

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Advocates Protest Maine oil sands plan

PORTLAND, Maine, April 24 (UPI) -- Canadian regulators need to take a closer look at the potential environmental consequences of oil sands before backing more pipelines, an advocacy group said.

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News Release | Environment Maine

Mainers, Others Submit 41,000 Comments Against Tar Sands Pipeline

Portland, Maine—The Canadian National Energy Board today closed public input on the proposed Line 9 Reversal Phase I tar sands pipeline project after receiving more than 41,000 citizen comments in opposition. A coalition of 11 groups, including Environment Maine, Natural Resources Council of Maine, Sierra Club Maine, ENE (Environment Northeast), and Conservation Law Foundation, submitted the comments, which focus on the environmental and public health dangers presented by the tar sands project and the need for a comprehensive environmental and public safety review. If fully completed, the tar sands pipeline reversal could threaten the Androscoggin River, Sebago Lake, and Casco Bay.

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Report | Environment Maine Research & Policy Center

Wasting Our Waterways 2012

Industrial facilities continue to dump millions of pounds of toxic chemicals into America’s rivers, streams, lakes and ocean waters each year—threatening both the environment and human health. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), pollution from industrial facilities is responsible for threatening or fouling water quality in more than 14,000 miles of rivers and streams, more than 220,000 acres of lakes, ponds and estuaries nationwide.

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2011 mishaps sent sewage to stream, wetland

A $17 million project meant to prevent sewage from getting into Bond Brook ended up causing more than 200,000 gallons of untreated sewage to flow into the stream and into a nearby wetland. Bond Brook is also spawning grounds for the endangered Atlantic salmon and the spills happened about when the fish lay their eggs, an environmental group says.

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