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News Release | Environment Maine Research and Policy Center

Environment Maine Report Examines Climatic Changes Through a Generational Perspective

PORTLAND – Environment Maine released a new report today that examines climatic impacts over five generations. The report, Dangerous Inheritance: The Hotter, More Extreme Climate that We’re Passing Down to America’s Young, examines changes in temperature, storm intensity and sea level rise through the eyes of five different generations. New Englanders of today are experiencing 28 percent more rain and snowfall than Baby Boomers experienced in the 1970s. The Millennial Generation entered adulthood during the hottest ten-year period in the last 100 years. Larger storms have increased 20 to 30 percent in Maine, packing a punch to families and businesses in Maine’s coastal communities.

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Report | Environment Maine Research & Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

American wind power already produced enough energy in 2013 to power 15 million homes. Continued, rapid development of wind energy would allow the renewable resource to supply 30 percent of the nation’s electricity by 2030, providing more than enough carbon reductions to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan.

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Report | Environment Maine Research & Policy Center

America’s Dirtiest Power Plants

As international leaders prepare for the United Nations Climate Summit next week in New York, a new study shows America’s power plants dump as much carbon pollution into the air any other country’s entire economy except China. Environment Maine Research & Policy Center pointed to the report as evidence for why the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposal for the nation’s first-ever limits on carbon pollution from power plants is a critical step in the international fight against global warming.

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Report | National Wildlife Federation

Catching the Wind: State Actions Needed to Seize the Golden Opportunity of Atlantic Offshore Wind Power

More than 1.5 million acres off the Atlantic coast have been designated for offshore wind power development, enough to produce more than 16,000 megawatts of electricity and power more than five million homes, according to a new report from the National Wildlife Federation.

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