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Slowing cargo ships cuts pollution near ports by more than half, study finds

Slowing cargo vessels near coastlines by 10 to 15 miles per hour could dramatically cut ships’ air pollution, according to a new study. But only a few U.S. ports have initiated such efforts. A speed limit of 14 mph, down from the current cruising speeds of 25 to 29 mph, would cut nitrogen oxides – a main ingredient of smog – by 55 percent and soot by almost 70 percent. It also would reduce carbon dioxide – a potent greenhouse gas and key contributor to climate change – by 60 percent. With 100,000 ships carrying 90 percent of the world’s cargo, air pollution is a heavy burden for people living near ports, so slowing ships could improve their health, researchers say.

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Maine ripe for energy-efficiency savings, study says

Maine homes and businesses could trim their overall electricity consumption by 16 percent over the next decade by installing more-efficient lights, equipment and appliances, a new study for Efficiency Maine Trust has concluded.

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New wind farm completed in Hancock County

 A new, 19-turbine wind farm in Hancock County, which has the capacity to supply the average energy needs of 18,000 homes, has been completed.

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Report: Tax Incentives Vital for Wind Power Development

Renewable energy advocates in Maine issued a report today spelling out what they believe must be done to make offshore wind power a reality. The report details what supporters see as the economic and environmental benefits of offshore wind in Maine. 

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Mainers gain on oil-free objective

The sound of heating systems coming to life this month is a rude awakening, following a warm and sunny summer. But it's a sound that's being heard less often in Maine, when it comes to oil heat.

The amount of heating oil burned in Maine homes in 2010 declined to levels not seen since 1984. Consumption has been falling steadily since 2004 and is expected to continue
The total amount of heating oil burned in Maine households was cut by more than half from 2004 to 2010, to about 189 million gallons.

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